Posts Tagged With: ride norway

Ride in your own country this year

Spend your money in your own country this year and come ride Norway next season.

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The Corona pandemic requires for you to spend your hard-earned cash at home this year. Other people depend on it. Welcome back to Norway next season! (Image: Sølvi Strifeldt)

 

Most countries have imposed strict measures in an effort to curb the Corona pandemic. Shops, restaurants and hotels are closed. This has an impact on people in your country and in your neighborhood, losing their jobs and income. Now they need your help. They need you to spend your money at home this year, to help save other people from bankruptcy. As motorcycle riders per definition are socially conscious people, I am sure you too will ride and spend your hard-earned money in your home country this year, and come over to ride Norway next year. We will warmly welcome you back in 2021. RideNorway.com will keep the roads in good order and the beer cold while we wait for you 🙂

Stay safe!

Categories: corona, Misc | Tags: , , , , , | 2 Comments

12 December: Top 3 reasons to choose a motorcycle when visiting Norway

RideNorway is counting down to Winter Solstice with trip planning tips and trivia!

12 December: The top 3 reasons why you should choose a motorcycle for visiting Norway.

Of course you, as the die-hard rider that you are, know that there are only one way to visit Norway – or indeed any country on the planet – which is by motorcycle. Nothing beats the feeling of fresh air, control of you bike, a nice curve or chewing flies that somehow managed to get between your mouth and the visor. But did you know that Norway is particularly catering for motorcyclists? Here are the top 3 reasons why a bike is the way to go when visiting this country:

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Bikes park for free, and are excempt from road, bridge and tunnel tolls. (Image: RideNorway.com)

1. No road tolls

Yep, it’s true. You do not pay road tolls, bridge crossing fees or any other fees for using the roads. You are free to roam. Most places you don’t even pay for parking. There is only one tunnel where you need to pay – the undersea tunnel from Averøy to Kristiansund – but that is also so cheap for bikes that you really won’t mind.

 

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They do not recognize us – but refrain from speeding nevertheless. Safety first – then wallet. (Image: wikipedia.org)

2. Speed cameras don’t recognize bikes

Do not take this as an invitation to speed. It isn’t, and you may get caught by a highway patrol – and getting caught for speeding is expensive. But in the event that you in a moment of inspiration or plain joy pass a speed camera in a somewhat higher speed than what is indicated on the signs – do not despair. Norway is governed by rule of law, and nobody can be charged or penalized if you are not properly identified. Behind a helmet, your face is obscured and proper identification is impossible. Therefore, the lawmakers have stated that speed cameras will not and cannot detect motorcycles and its rider.

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Norway takes care of you as a rider. You can even use the bus lanes. (Image: NMCU.org)

3. You can use bus lanes

Our lawmakers have recognized that riders are more vulnerable than other road users (bar pedestrians and bicyclists), which is why the allow for riders to use the bus lanes. It is in other words a safety measure just for us. This is particularly handy when nearing the bigger towns and cities of Norway. When nearing a traffic jam, just swoop over to the bus lane, and off you go. You can also filter between the cars in a jam situation, if there are no bus lanes. Handy, right?

We told you that Norway is made for riding. Agree?

Categories: Good to know | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

Gone touring!

If postings appears to be rare, it’s because I’m out there enjoying Norway in the most fantastic summer we’ve had since 1947.

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Let me correct that: The most fantastic summer since 1947 in the South of Norway. In the North, the weather is record-breaking miserable, although at time of writing this, it seems to clear up a bit.

Anyway: In the South, we’ve had a steady state of sun and warmth – real warmth – for some two consecutive months. Oslo has been the warmes capital in Europe for a while, and it’s so dry that there is a total ban on open fire everywhere. In the South, I mean. Up North, you can still light your barbeque, if you find that comforting.

This, of course, calls for adventures! There are plenty of bikes roaming the roads everywhere, and I hope some of you had the chance to experience this. I am, so if you find postings rare, it’s because I’m out there. In Hardanger, Fjorda, Stryn, Hornindal, Fiskevollen – boy, this is a summer to remember.

I hope to see you on the road somewhere! Have a great summer!

Categories: Images of Norway, norway | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Show your Norway know-how!

Baffle your audience with your insight into Norway trivia. Here are 20 ice-breakers to get the conversation started.

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The length of the Norwegian coastline is 2nd only to Canada.

 

Even most Norwegians don’t know that parts of Northern Norway is further East than Istanbul. Or that more Norwegians than Canadians speak English. Armed with these 20 fun facts about Norway, you are ready to engage the domestic audience with your insight. Norwegians tend to be viewed as a bit introvert. But we aren’t, really. We’re just being polite by not disturbing you in any way, or wasting your precious time. A bit like the Finns. Until we’re partying, that is. In any case, these are good ice-breakers to get Norwegians to talk about other things than the weather. Good luck!

Categories: Good to know | Tags: , , , , , | 8 Comments

Tourist roads actually worth riding

Many are put off the “touristy stuff” – but the Norwegian National Tourist Roads are actually worth riding.

The Norwegian Public Roads Administration (NPRA) has its own department for the National Tourist Roads. The 18 very special roads have been updated with nicely built viewpoints and some arty stuff, but the most important thing are the roads themselves. They are narrow roads, cutting through some of the most scenic landscape in all parts of Norway. The NPRA has even commissioned an Architecture Council to, as it is stated, “ensure high visual qualit of scenic viewpoints and picnic areas along the routes”.

Fancy. But check out their homepage to see where the roads are, plan your trip, and see what you can expect when you find them.

Hardangervidda. (Image from www.nasjonaleturistveger.no)

Hardangervidda. (Image from http://www.nasjonaleturistveger.no)

Gaularfjellet. (Image from www.nasjonaleturistveger.no)

Gaularfjellet. (Image from http://www.nasjonaleturistveger.no)

Categories: Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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