Posts Tagged With: norway

Riding Norway a la bourgeoisie

Staying in tents is not your cup of tea? Then the Hub Riding concept may be just up your alley.

Snip from HUB riding web page.

While tents and free roaming for many is an integrated part of motorcycle travel, quite a few of us are getting accustomed to a higher level of comfort. Yes – we are talking hotels. But in this case, rather special hotels. Not your average by-the-road motel or chain hotel. No, here we are talking of really special hotels at really special places.

“De Historiske” – The Historic Hotels – is a group of special, old and magnificently situated hotels in Norway. The group has created a new concept – Hub Riding – where they suggest a route for you as a motorcycle rider, and – lo and behold – the routes even interlinks the hotels in The Historic group. Of course it is a marketing and sales thingy. However, you are of course not obilged to stay at their hotels to enjoy the routes. If you choose to do so, The Historic Hotels are truly situated at wonderful spots, and each of them carries quite a history. We have stayed at several of them (typically after payday) and enjoyed the sites, the food and the differentness of these special places. Fun fact: The Hub routes are named after motorcycles, e.g. Route KTM, Route Ducati etc.

So if you have the funds to spend to enjoy Norway a la bourgeoisie, visit HubRiding.no to be inspired. Or have a look at the promo film.

Categories: bikes, norway, Routes | Tags: , , , | 5 Comments

When is Norway open for travel?

It seems like the pandemic clouds are rolling back. But when is Norway open for riding?

Still hard to tell, but sign up over at Visit Norway to be the first to know: https://www.visitnorway.com/newsletter/

As promised, we have kept the roads in good order and the beer cold. You may at least shake the dust off your riding plans from last year and start looking forward to a riding experience only Norway can provide. Stay tuned!

Categories: Good to know | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Can I go to Norway now?

UPDATE 21 FEB 2021: The Corona virus is still roaming the world and will most likely not go away for a while. This, of course, has an impact on travel to Norway too, even for the 2021 riding season.

Norwegian health authorities are updating their travel guidance on a regular basis. The border control varies according to the transmission rates around Norway. Keep abreast with the current situation at the National Institute of Public Health. Breaching regulations or any imposed quarantine will invoke heavy monetary penalties and expulsion from Norway, and you are exposing other people to a serious health hazard – do NOT breach regulations! Motorcyclists are of course by default socially responsible and competent individuals, so you will not expose anyone to increased risk by not following guidelines.

Enjoy your planning, and stay safe!

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Ride in your own country this year

Spend your money in your own country this year and come ride Norway next season.

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The Corona pandemic requires for you to spend your hard-earned cash at home this year. Other people depend on it. Welcome back to Norway next season! (Image: Sølvi Strifeldt)

 

Most countries have imposed strict measures in an effort to curb the Corona pandemic. Shops, restaurants and hotels are closed. This has an impact on people in your country and in your neighborhood, losing their jobs and income. Now they need your help. They need you to spend your money at home this year, to help save other people from bankruptcy. As motorcycle riders per definition are socially conscious people, I am sure you too will ride and spend your hard-earned money in your home country this year, and come over to ride Norway next year. We will warmly welcome you back in 2021. RideNorway.com will keep the roads in good order and the beer cold while we wait for you 🙂

Stay safe!

Categories: corona, Misc | Tags: , , , , , | 2 Comments

Wait for it, wait for it…

Spend your Corona quarantine time wisely, and plan for better days. See you at the other end!

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(Image is shamelessly stolen from the Visit Norway homepage.)

Categories: Misc, Uncategorized | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

23 December: Top 3 fun facts about Norway

RideNorway is counting down to Winter Solstice with trip planning tips and trivia!

23 December: Top 3 fun facts about Norway

We have our oddities and funny facts about this country too. Here are our top 3 fun facts about Norway:

 

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C3PO at Finse. (Image: starwarsplaces.com)

1. The Battle of Hoth was filmed at Finse

In Star Wars – Episode V (film two in old trilogy, for the SW fans out there) – you would see the Rebellion HQ at the snowy planet of Hoth being attacked by the Empire. These epic scenes were filmed only a few hundred meters away from the railway station of Finse, a stop along the Oslo – Bergen train tracks. Legend has it that no taun-taun has been observed in the area since.

 

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They have even provided proper stops inside the tunnel so you can take your photos.

2. The World’s longest road tunnel is in Norway

You know you want to ride it: The 24.5 km/15.2 mi long Laerdal Tunnel not very far from Bergen is the longest road tunnel in the world. It opened in 2000 after five years of construction, and pushed the Swiss Gotthard Tunnel down from the throne. A special ride indeed.

 

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Huuuuuge structure!

3. The largest object ever moved by man was moved in Norway

The Troll A gas production platform is the largest object ever moved by humans. The platform is 472 meters high – of which 369 under water – and weighs about 656 million kgs. This huge structure is two times heavier than Empire State Building in NY City, and the underwater part of Troll is exactly the height of Empire State Building top floor. Troll A is mostly a concrete structure that contains reinforcing steel corresponding to 10 times the entire Eiffel tower.

Read more Norway fun facts here!

Categories: Misc, norway | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment

10 December: 3 essential bring-alongs for your Norway trip

RideNorway is counting down to Winter Solstice with trip planning tips and trivia!

10 December: 3 essentials to bring for your Norway trip

Not counting your camping and riding equipment, there are some things you should specifically bring for your Norway trip. Of course you can buy these things in Norway, but make sure that you bring them one way or another for an even better experience.

 

 

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Fishing in the sea is for free, in lakes you pay a very small fee. River fishing for salmon is another matter. Do not try, unless you are really certain what you are doing and have paid the fees. (Image: RideNorway.com)

1. Fishing rod

Do not leave home without it! Fishing in the sea is for free, and fishing in lakes is available for a meager fee – you can buy a license at the nearest petrol station or kiosk. The catch is good, especially in the sea, and the quality of the fish is top notch.

 

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Bring your mosquito repellant. Just in case. (Image: RideNorway.com)

2. Mosquito repellant

Especially if you are venturing north, you should bring a good mosquito repellant. Preferably a repellant that also scares off midges and ticks. We do not have any really dangerous insects or spiders roaming around in this country – it’s not like Australia – but the aforementioned critters may be a significant annoyance unless you have your quality repellant at hand.

 

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You will be in one of the most scenic countries in the world. Don’t regret you didn’t bring your binoculars. (Image: RideNorway.com)

3. Binoculars

You are probably bringing your camera with you, but a pair of quality binoculars is very good to have. When at the coast, you might spot some mammals swimming around in the sea, perhaps even an Orca. Or for bird watching, even if you are not the typical bird watching type. Remember that long sunny evenings, in the north 24 hrs sunlight, gives you ample time to sit outside your tent, savouring a wee dram while looking at the surroundings.

Any other essentials you would bring for your Norway trip? Let us know in the comments below!

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6 December: Top 3 food festivals in Norway

Norwegians celebrate “Jul” (from old norse Yule) on 24 December. RideNorway is counting down to Winter Solstice with trip planning tips and trivia!

6 December: Top 3 food festivals in Norway

Going to food festivals is a great way of getting a great chew for a small price. So also in Norway. The foodies are having more choices than ever in this country, and some regions have really got their act together and are producing high quality foodstuff which you can sample in abundance. RideNorway has been to several throughout the years, and these are our top 3 picks:

 

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Trøndersk Food Festival in Trondheim. If you are a foodie: Go there. If you are not: Go there anyway. Image: RideNorway

1) Trøndersk Matfestival – Trondheim

The Mid-Norway region – the county of Trøndelag – is getting a firm grip on becoming the most important local food region of Norway. In late July/early August, the Trønders are celebrating their fantastic food and beer culture by throwing “Trøndersk Matfestival” in the middle of the town of Trondheim. Whole streets are full of food samples, outlets, local fast food and drinks – a spectacle that we can wholeheartedly recommend. Everything is under tent roofs, so even in poor weather you can enjoy this festival. Park your bike for a day or two, and indulge in flavours that could only come from Norway!

 

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Happy food, happy people in Stavanger. Image: RideNorway

2) Gladmatfestivalen – Stavanger

Literally “The Happy Food Festival” is an annual event taking place in July in the oil capital of Norway, Stavanger in the South West of the country. It is not far from the entry port of Kristiansand, in case you take the ferry from Denmark. The festival takes place downtown Stavanger, covering the whole harbour area. Even if this is not strictly a Norwegian flavour’s festival, you can find high quality edibles for a meager price during the days the festival lasts. As in Trondheim, they usually have a beer festival tent close by, if you need to quench your thirst. The only major downside of this festival, is the constant influx of cruise ship tourists clogging the festival area.

 

3) Bergen Food Festival – Bergen

This is still one for RideNorway to visit, but it is definitely on the shortlist of great food festivals in Norway – if we take hear-say into account. It is held in Bergen – a pretty town on the west coast of Norway, worth a visit in any case. The festival, usually held in end-August/early September, includes the Cider Festival. Believe it or not, but cider from the Hardanger region is truly delicious! It must have something to do with traditions going back to the 13th century, great craftmanship and nice surroundings for the fruit trees.

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4 December: Top 3 destinations NOT in the official Norway guidebooks

Norwegians celebrate “Jul” (from old norse Yule) on 24 December. RideNorway is counting down to Winter Solstice with trip planning tips and trivia!

4 December: Top 3 destinations NOT in the official Norway guidebooks

If you are a seasoned Norway traveller, or just want to go to places that are not necessarily the postcard picture perfect place, this post is for you. You really don’t care too much for the crowded (all in relative terms, of course – this is not Venice…) tourist attractions in Norway, but are instead looking for places which give you solitude, quietness and additional bragging rights when back home in the local pub with your friends. You are willing to ride that extra mile just to get to this place, and don’t mind staying the night in your tent – so here it is, RideNorway’s Top 3 destinations NOT in the official Norway guidebooks:

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Hessdalen is peaceful, quiet and a great place to walk the dog. But in a leash. Because of the sheep. Image: RideNorway

1) Hessdalen

Hessdalen is a somewhat secluded valley not far from Røros, in the middle of Norway. Or middle of nowhere, depending on your take. Hessdalen is one of RideNorway’s favourite spots to find peace and quiet in this part of the country, but despite its quietness it still has some suspense to offer: Hessdalen’s claim to fame is the odd light phenomenons that may – or may not – occur at any given time. There are apparently studies of these phenomenons taking place. But for us, it’s a place of tranquility. Follow the road beyond where it goes gravel, and find your spot to put up your tent whenever you like. Bring everything you need – it is a bit to ride to the nearest grocery store if you forgot your bacon to your breakfast eggs.

 

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Finnskogen is a favourite rideout for many gravel enthusiasts. Image: RideNorway

2) Finnskogen

Finnskogen – or “The Forest of the Finns” – is an area in the South-East of Norway, bordering Sweden. Its name origins from the Finns that migrated here in the 17th century. But to you, it is an area of forested secludedness. An area where you can hone your gravel riding skills, while finding those sweet spots near a lake to put up your tent and try you fishing luck. Even though it is pretty accessible by vehicles, not many venture into these forests, which makes it a sweet playground for you and your bike. The silence is breathtaking, which makes it the perfect hideout for a couple of days to lower your puls rate.

 

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Fiskevollen has its 10th century charm somewhat intact. Image: RideNorway

3) Fiskevollen

Fiskevollen is Norway’s largest inland fishing village, dating back to the 10th century. It is situated in Rendalen in the South-East of Norway, and sits at some 700 meters above the sea level. Today, it is holiday homes for the locals, but it has retained its picturesque quality. The Sølensjøen lake is a nice place to try your fishing luck, and you can put up your tent out of ear’s reach of the few people that occupy the cottages during the summer months. It can be chilly at this height even in the summer, so to experience a night or two at Fiskevollen: Make sure your sleeping gear can take it. Oh, and the road there is a wonderful gravel road!

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1 December: Norway’s Top 3 motorcycle roads

Norwegians celebrate “Jul” (from old norse Yule) on 24 December. RideNorway is counting down to Winter Solstice with trip planning tips and trivia!

1 December: Top 3 Roads of Norway

We all have our favourite riding roads. Some like the gravel road kind, others like the scenic ones. Norway is full of wonderful motorcycle roads, so choosing the best is almost impossible. However, this is RideNorway’s current top pick:

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The Varanger Route is right on top of our (current) Top 3 Roads of Norway. (Photo: RideNorway.com)

1) The Varanger Route. 160 km’s of very special road from Varangerbotn to Hamningberg way up North in Norway. It’s one of our favourite routes because it’s not overfilled with tourists in slow camper vans, the scenerys different from anything else, and this writer is from the area. Ok, very biased, but the fact remains: If you can, do the Varanger road. You will not regret it.

 

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The Suleskar Mountain Road seems like it was made for motorcycles. It’s just great! (Photo: Suleskarvegen.no)

2) The Suleskar Mountain Road. It is true: This road was practically made for motorcycles. It is narrow, twisty and great fun. It takes you over a magnificent mountain range, and leads you even to Lysebotn. The hairpins taking you there are legendary. The only downside is that you will encounter some camper vans along the route. They may be hard to pass due to the at times narrow road, but most of the drivers are polite and will pull over to let you pass. Don’t let this minor annoyance put you off: Explore Suleskar!

 

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You must not miss the Coastal Route – Road 17 – when you visit Norway. Ride along it and feel the heartbeat rate slow to a leisurly pace. (Photo: RideNorway.com)

3) The Coastal Route of Northern Norway. No list is complete without it. 650 kms, plenty of ferries – this is the road you choose to lower your heartbeat. Make sure you plan somewhat ahead to see all the juicy parts, which may require a deviation from the Road 17 itself. You should plan for at least 5 days, although it is doable in 3 if you hasten through. But you do not want to do that. It needs to be savoured slowly.

If you have been riding Norway – do you agree with these picks? Or do you have other favourites? Leave your comment below!

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