Posts Tagged With: gear

10 December: 3 essential bring-alongs for your Norway trip

RideNorway is counting down to Winter Solstice with trip planning tips and trivia!

10 December: 3 essentials to bring for your Norway trip

Not counting your camping and riding equipment, there are some things you should specifically bring for your Norway trip. Of course you can buy these things in Norway, but make sure that you bring them one way or another for an even better experience.

 

 

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Fishing in the sea is for free, in lakes you pay a very small fee. River fishing for salmon is another matter. Do not try, unless you are really certain what you are doing and have paid the fees. (Image: RideNorway.com)

1. Fishing rod

Do not leave home without it! Fishing in the sea is for free, and fishing in lakes is available for a meager fee – you can buy a license at the nearest petrol station or kiosk. The catch is good, especially in the sea, and the quality of the fish is top notch.

 

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Bring your mosquito repellant. Just in case. (Image: RideNorway.com)

2. Mosquito repellant

Especially if you are venturing north, you should bring a good mosquito repellant. Preferably a repellant that also scares off midges and ticks. We do not have any really dangerous insects or spiders roaming around in this country – it’s not like Australia – but the aforementioned critters may be a significant annoyance unless you have your quality repellant at hand.

 

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You will be in one of the most scenic countries in the world. Don’t regret you didn’t bring your binoculars. (Image: RideNorway.com)

3. Binoculars

You are probably bringing your camera with you, but a pair of quality binoculars is very good to have. When at the coast, you might spot some mammals swimming around in the sea, perhaps even an Orca. Or for bird watching, even if you are not the typical bird watching type. Remember that long sunny evenings, in the north 24 hrs sunlight, gives you ample time to sit outside your tent, savouring a wee dram while looking at the surroundings.

Any other essentials you would bring for your Norway trip? Let us know in the comments below!

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Time to lose weight

It’s still a couple of months until we depart for this summer’s great gravel road expedition, and I need to lose some weight. Off the gear. Here are 6 weight-shedding items.

Aiming at max comfort, I packed my WR250R way too heavy for gravel riding on my test trip. Now it's time to lose some weight!

Aiming at max camping comfort, I packed my WR250R way too heavy for gravel riding on my test trip. Now it’s time to lose some weight!

 

A couple of weekends ago, a buddy of mine and I went for a weekend gravel trip into the Forest of the Finns near the Swedish border. This was some sort of a shakedown trip, as I packed the bike as I thought I would for the upcoming gravel expedition from South to North of Norway, paying special attention to bring along stuff that would make the nightly stay-overs more comfortable. You know – a bed AND a mattress, a big roomy lavvo, fat sleeping bag, et cetera. Heavy, but comfortable and cozy.

Ingenious design on this table.

Ingenious design on this table.

The incredibly light and small-packed Helinox chair. And it actually works!

The incredibly light and small-packed Helinox chair. And it actually works!

Not particularly surprising, this focus on comfort also meant that the bike behaved like a pig on the loose surfaced and quite muddy gravel roads. It became far too heavy overall, and particularly in the rear. I could not imagine a ride like that for some 5000 kms return. So I need to lose some weight. Off the gear I’ll bring.

So here is parts of my weight shedding plan:

A down McKinley sleeping bag. Being stuffed with down (90%) and feather (10%), it is light (1 kg), packs really small, have a decent rating of 0C, and is – above all – on sale for half price at the local outdoor gear store.

McKinley Enduro Ultralight.

McKinley Enduro Ultralight.

McKinley Enduro Ultralight tent. Weighing in at 1.3 kgs, it’s very light and not very expensive. The downside is that it’s only a single sheet tent, so it’ll probably not be 100% dry in case of heavy rain, which is why I’ll also bring along a tarp.

Dovrefjell Tarp 4. This 3×4 m tarp is very light, packs very small, and provides extra shelter in case of foul weather.

Exped Downmat 9 sleeping mattress. It packs quite small, and provides all the sleeping comfort I’ll ever need.

McKinley sleeping bag

McKinley sleeping bag

Helinox chair and table. These collapsible camp furniture are extremely light and also packs unbelievably small. I’ve tried them in the field, and they really work! They’re a bit on the pricey side, though, but lightness costs.

I haven’t checked the total weight yet, but I’ll think it’ll be around 6 kgs, which seems quite good.

Now all I have to do in addition is to bring lightweight food, cooking gear and clothes. Oh, and let me know if you have any tips on lightweight gear!

Categories: Misc | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

9 useful things to bring

Beside your bike, riding gear, passport and credit card, there are a few things that makes out the mainstay of every riders touring set-up. These are the 9 things I can’t do without.

A lavvo is the ultimate compromise between enough living space and pack size. A mainstay in my touring set-up.

A lavvo is the ultimate compromise between enough living space and pack size. A mainstay in my touring set-up.

Categories: Good to know | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

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