The North Sea & Southern Mountains Roads

This route will take you 6 days in a leisurly pace. But it is worth slowing down and see the scenery. It takes you over some of the nicest mountain roads in the Southern Norway, and even let you see some really nice, twisty roads in the south-west.

Jon and I did this trip a couple of years back, and did push it a bit as Jon didn’t have any more days off and I had to get to my bike to service. But even then it was a nice ride. Explore it yourself!

The Suleskard Mountain Road. Photo credit: NRK.no

The Suleskard Mountain Road. Photo credit: NRK.no

Jon (right) with his XRV 750 Honda Africa Twin, and me with my Moto Guzzi 850 Griso.

Jon (right) with his XRV 750 Honda Africa Twin, and me with my Moto Guzzi 850 Griso.

Day 1: Oslo – Sinnes. A road that takes you to beautiful Dalen, with its really special hotel (but way too expensive for us), over the Suleskard montain road, which is only open in the summer, and to Sinnes where we pitched our lavvo at Haugen camping.

Day 2: Sinnes – Sandnes. A rather short leg, but the North Sea Road 44 is so nice and twisty that it requires to be savoured properly. We pitched our lavvo at a camp site just outside Sandnes, which is near Stavanger. Make sure you stop at the Altmark Incident Memorial in Jøssingfjorden.

Dalen Hotel.  Photo credit: Wikimedia Commons

Dalen Hotel.
Photo credit: Wikimedia Commons

Day 3: Sandnes – Hornindal. This was a bit too stretchy, with more than 12 hours in the saddle and mainly along the main roads. It requires quite a few ferries, so it takes even longer to do the close to 600 kms. It should have been cut in two, but we needed to be in Hornindal for a service appointment for my Guzzi. But it’s doable, and Rolf’s camp in Grodås is – if not very stylish, so at least very pleasant.

See those houses under the cliff? They haven't needed roofing since they were new some hundred of years ago.

See those houses under the cliff? They haven’t needed roofing since they were new some hundred of years ago.

Day 4: Hornindal – Oslo over the Old Strynefjell Mountain Road (google maps will not show it as it is closed for the winter at time of writing, but the road sign is very clear, road 258). A gravel road as some of us really likes it! This route also includes the Valdresflye road 51, where it usually is some snow here and there (not on the road, though), at least at the time of year we were there. It’s a long day, this one too, but still doable. I would have preferred to cut it into two days, though.

The start of the old Strynefjell Mountain Road. Nice!

The start of the old Strynefjell Mountain Road. Nice!

5 Comments

5 thoughts on “The North Sea & Southern Mountains Roads

  1. Nick Gebruers

    How about being a solo rider? Is it feasible?

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    • Hi Nick – solo riding is quite OK, no worries. It’s nowhere near – like – crossing the Sahara.

      Like

      • Nick Gebruers

        Thank you Hans for your reply.
        How about the riding conditions in April? Is it doable that time of year? I’ve done Scotland in the same period of year and it was fantastic. We were the only 2 motorcycles there, yet Norway is still a bit more to the North in comparison to Scotland.

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      • Hi, April is perhaps a tad on the wrong side of great riding conditions – of course depending on where in the country you want to ride, the South being more forgiveable. But there may still be snow around, especially as you gain altitude. I would suggest mid-May at the earliest, and even then you may encounter closed mountain roads due to snow. The famous Trollstigen, for example, usually opens in June.

        Like

      • Nick Gebruers

        Hey, Thx again for the quick reply. If i would come in April, I would stay below the line Oslo-Bergen.

        Like

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